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What To Do After Suffering a Workplace Injury?

A workplace injury is never fun, but it’s even worse when you don’t know what to do about it. Luckily for you, I’ve got answers! After suffering a work-related accident, follow these steps to make sure you’re being treated with the utmost respect and care:

Document All Details

When you suffer a workplace injury, it’s essential to document all details. Your employer is legally obligated to use reasonable care in protecting you from harm. If they don’t document your injury, the company might be unable to show that they were taking reasonable precautions or that there was any way for them to avoid the accident.

Documenting everything can be tedious and time-consuming, but it will help protect you in case of a lawsuit or dispute with your employer later on down the road. You should write down:

  • The date, time, and location of your injury (or illness).

  • The circumstances leading up to the injury/illness—what happened immediately before? Were there any signs or warnings? What did others who witnessed this incident say happened? What did they think contributed most directly toward causing this problem? How long had those conditions been present without being addressed prior? How often do similar problems occur at work?”

  • What happened during this incident—did something fall on someone’s head while working above ground level outdoors; did another employee drop something heavy onto their foot while standing behind someone else doing some kind of heavy lifting duty inside an enclosed area where workers typically walk around without wearing special footwear meant explicitly designed for protection against falling objects thrown forcefully downward onto unprotected toes below…etc.

Inform Your Employer

Once you’ve suffered a workplace injury, your priority is to tell your employer. You should tell them what happened and how it happened when it happened and where it happened. If you have any medical needs or questions the company should know about, make sure to let them know. And if you’re unable to talk with your employer about the issue because of its sensitive nature (for instance, if someone else caused the accident), explain this fact as well—you’ll want everyone on board so they can help you move forward quickly.

File A Workers Comp Claim

A workplace injury is never fun, but it’s even worse when you don’t know what to do about it. Luckily for you, I’ve got answers! After suffering a work-related accident, follow these steps to make sure you’re being treated with the utmost respect and care:

Seek Medical Attention

This may seem obvious, but it can be easy to ignore your injuries until the pain becomes unbearable.

Make sure you have a copy of your medical records. If you are injured and not covered by workers’ compensation (see below), you may be able to file a claim with your health insurance later on.

Document All Details

When you suffer a workplace injury, it’s essential to document all details. Your employer is legally obligated to use reasonable care in protecting you from harm. If they don’t document your injury, the company might be unable to show that they were taking reasonable precautions or that there was any way for them to avoid the accident.

Documenting everything can be tedious and time-consuming, but it will help protect you in case of a lawsuit or dispute with your employer later on down the road. You should write down:

  • The date, time, and location of your injury (or illness).

  • The circumstances leading up to the injury/illness—what happened immediately before? Were there any signs or warnings? What did others who witnessed this incident say happened? What did they think contributed most directly toward causing this problem? How long had those conditions been present without being addressed prior? How often do similar problems occur at work?”

  • What happened during this incident—did something fall on someone’s head while working above ground level outdoors; did another employee drop something heavy onto their foot while standing behind someone else doing some kind of heavy lifting duty inside an enclosed area where workers typically walk around without wearing special footwear meant explicitly designed for protection against falling objects thrown forcefully downward onto unprotected toes below…etc.

Inform Your Employer

Once you’ve suffered a workplace injury, your priority is to tell your employer. You should tell them what happened and how it happened when it happened and where it happened. If you have any medical needs or questions the company should know about, make sure to let them know. And if you’re unable to talk with your employer about the issue because of its sensitive nature (for instance, if someone else caused the accident), explain this fact as well—you’ll want everyone on board so they can help you move forward quickly.

File A Workers Comp Claim

This is a crucial action to take. Workers’ compensation is insurance that you and your employer pay into so you can receive medical treatment, disability payments, and other benefits while unable to work because of a workplace injury. Your employer will automatically file your claim with the state’s workers’ compensation office, but it’s up to you to guide them through this process.

You must file immediately after the accident, even if you are still in pain or have not yet seen a doctor for your injuries. The sooner you file, the more likely your claim will be approved quickly and easily—which means coverage for your medical expenses sooner!

Suppose an injured worker does not notify his/her employer of their injury within 90 days from when it happened. In that case, they may lose their right to sue their employer for damages under common law theories such as negligence or strict liability.

 

At Price & Randle, LLC we are ready to help you navigate your worker’s compensation claim and are just a phone call away at (573) 444-5555

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